AgileByExample

Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying Agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. Jutta has recently pair-written with John Buck a book entitled Company-wide Agility with Beyond Budgeting, Open Space & Sociocracy (dubbed BOSSA nova). Besides that, she has published her experience in her books Agile Software Development in the Large, Agile Software Development with Distributed Teams, Retrospectives for Organizational Change, and together with Johanna Rothman Diving for Hidden Treasures: Uncovering the Cost of Delay in your Project Portfolio.

Jutta is a member of the Agile Alliance (having served the board of directors from 2003-2007) and a member of the program committee of many different American, Asian, and European conferences, where she has also presented her work. She holds a M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, a Dipl.Eng. (MSc.) in Product-Engineering, a B.A. in Education, and is trained as pollution control commissioner on ecological environmentalism.

Keynote—Increasing Productivity by Uncovering Costs of Delay

Fred Brooks once stated so wisely "How does a project get to be a year late? … One day at a time." Lean Development and queuing theories offer help so that this won't happen. The suggested remedy is to implement a steady flow in order to achieve maximum productivity. However, most teams and organizations are far from reaching that goal and moreover, it is often unclear which approach leads to what kind of delay. In-depth examination shows how generally accepted concepts such as Definition of Ready, Clean Code, or experts in a team can lead to costs of delay. In this session, Jutta presents simple tools and methods for uncovering hidden costs of delay. These tools and methods can be applied in various contexts: In small and large teams as well as in co-located and distributed teams. Using an agile approach will help to make these costs visible.

Workshop—Agile Sustainability: You can be more – social, environmental, and economic – sustainable based on data!

According to one forecast, IT will account for 21% of global energy consumption by 2030. If we don't change the way we implement software, we will contribute to increasing the carbon footprint. So, it's time to examine how agility can help to reduce energy consumption and ensure greater - environmental, social & economic - sustainability. The point is not to pursue sustainability for altruistic reasons, but
to understand that over time, sustainability is also becoming a key factor that determines the success of companies, both in the search
for talent and for customers and markets. Gain a holistic perspective of your team or company’s current situation regarding agile sustainability by inspecting real data. Comparative Agile Sustainability is an approach that we created in a small team with the support of data analysts that serves to anchor and promote the awareness of sustainability in an (agile) team and/or company. The evaluation was published under creative commons and is therefore freely available to all interested parties. By using the results of this validated assessment, agile teams and organizations can better understand how they can increase their own effectiveness and contribute to increasing sustainability across the industry. In this session, we will examine how agile and sustainability connect and how we can leverage both for mutual benefit. Moreover, we will gather data on the actual status quo and discuss the next possible actions. Note, that a data-driven approach to sustainability doesn't mean we have all the answers - but that we can ask better questions.